MaxiCut Australia

MaxiCut Pty Limited
18 Quarry Road
Woodside, SA 5244
Australia
08 8389 9550 (Main Phone)
0428 895 725 (Mobile Phone)
Description
MaxiCut is a unique and innovative way to rejuvenate your vineyard using strong hydraulic vine shears that easily cut through tough vines and strong wires.
Our customers are grape growers, tired of using the outdated and inefficient old forms of vineyard rejuvenation and have turned to MaxiCut in need of a change.
They find value in MaxiCut due to our effective, time efficient and affordable services that allow them to remove eutypa, train new water shoots and replace their old, diseased vines with healthy new ones over a 2-3 year, 2 stage process, resulting in a 10-50% increase in production within the first year.
MaxiCut can also be used for grafting or simply just to convert from spur to cane pruning
The MaxiCut process starts with the vine shears and is followed by wound dressing, rubbish disposal, re-wiring, cane pruning and training. (The system may vary depending on the grower’s requirements and the stage of the process).




VINEYARD REJUVENATION
There are various reasons why you may decide to rejuvenate your vineyard.
Whether it's to remove old wood to increase sap flow, the removal of eutypa infection, grafting, or simply just to convert to cane pruning, we'll walk you through every step of the way and ensure a smooth process.

CONVERSION TO CANE PRUNING
Both cane pruning and spur pruning each have their benefits and certain factors such as variety, location, money, time, influence, tradition and more all play a major part in the grower’s decision to side with one or the other.
Many growers throughout Australia are deciding to transition from spur to cane pruning due to several reasons and as a result, are achieving an increase in vine health, allowing a higher production rate.

EUTYPA CONTROL
One of the major reasons why a grower may decide to rejuvenate their vines is to eliminate the spread of eutypa infection in the vine which unfortunately is an extremely common issue that many Australian growers face.
Eutypa dieback is one of the major trunk diseases in vineyards. The fungus grows slowly, causing stunted shoots and progressively killing spurs, cordons, trunks and eventually the entire vine.
To ensure the removal of eutypa, we recommend the 2-stage rejuvenation process over 2-3 years, resulting in the vine being replaced by a strong and healthy water shoot.

GRAFTING
MaxiCut is an ideal tool for growers who are looking to begin grafting their vines.
Grafting, also known as budding, is the process of converting one variety to another by inserting the bud of the new variety into the trunk of the old variety.
Before this can be done, the vine must be cut back at the trunk which will allow the nutrients and energy to pump into the new shoot system once grafted.

WOUND DRESSING
Within 24 hours after the cuts have been made, the wounds must be dressed to ensure that eutypa does not re-enter the vine.
What the wounds are dressed with is up to the grower, although we strongly recommend using Vinevax.

SPRAYING
There are different sprays that can be used for wound dressing shortly after the cut has been made.
This is to prevent Eutypa, harmful pathogens and fungal infections from entering the vine through the open wound and will work as a shield to protect against them.
The kind of spray used on the vine is down to the decision of the grower, although we highly recommend and nearly always use Vinevax, an effective and natural fungus Trichoderma, formulated to support colonisation of fresh grafting and pruning wounds which has been proven to protect your vines, even after 12 months.

PAINTING
The alternative to spraying the vines open wounds, is to paint them.
We can recommend some wound paint or like the spray, the grower can decide on the brand of paint that they would like to use.

RUBBISH DISPOSAL
After the rejuvenated cordons or trunks have been pulled out and placed into the middle of the row, the vine claw will then go through and collect the rubbish before placing it into a rubbish pile.
We ensure that no rubbish has been left behind by carrying out a second clean up by hand.
The rubbish pile will then be disposed of as requested by the grower.

PULLING
After the cordons/trunks have been cut, they will need to be pulled out of the trellis and placed in the middle of the row, ready to be cleaned up by the vine claw.
The vines are pulled into every second row and laid across the row to increase time management and efficiency.

VINE CLAW
We have specially manufactured a skid steer attachment (The Vine Claw) which allows us to easily gather, collect, carry and release the cut cordons/trunks/wires from the row and place them into the rubbish pile

HAND CLEAN-UP
The vine claw is followed by a walk-through, hand clean-up which allows for any missed rubbish including cordons/trunks and wires.
A vehicle, such as the quad bike with a trailer attached or a Ute or RTV will be driven by a trained and licensed employee, while 1-3 employees will follow behind, collecting any rubbish left over and placing it in the trailer.

PILING AND DISPOSAL
During the clean-up with both the vine claw and by hand, the rubbish will be placed in 1 or 2 piles, ready for disposal.
The type of disposal carried out is decided by the grower.

RE-WIRING
Re-wiring will need to be carried out before we can begin to prune or train the vines. This will include wire running, stapling, training, and tightening/securing the wires.

WIRE RUNNING
To begin this process, we start by securing the end of the wire at the straining post and carefully run it out across the length of the row using the quad bike or a small vehicle with the wire wheel attached.
It is then cut and secured at the strainer post on the other end of the row, ready for stapling.

STAPLING
After the wire has been run along the row, the stapling will begin, starting with the highs and lows of the block to ensure the tension of the wire is right once the straining is complete.
The remaining stapling will be done after the wires have been strained to ensure the tension and positioning is accurate.

STRAINING
Once the highs and lows of the block have been stapled, the wires will be strained and secured.
Like each of our tasks, all health and safety measures are very strict as this can be a risky practice if not taken seriously.

CANE PRUNING
Cane pruning begins with the careful selection of the required number of strong and healthy canes that will become your cordons. The canes that are not needed will be cut and the wounds dressed, followed by trimming, wrapping/arching, and tying.

CUTTING
The cane pruning process after the first year of using MaxiCut is the same as any ongoing year of cane pruning and one that a grower may become very familiar with if not already if they have previously had cane pruning experience.
Cane pruning begins with cutting which is performed after the required canes are selected.
Depending on the cane layout that the grower requires, the pruner will select a certain number of canes and a certain number of spurs (Often 2 of each) which are the most healthy, strong and best positioned. They will then cut off the remaining canes, allowing full growth potential for the selected canes.

TRIMMING
After the cutting has been carried out, the canes are trimmed to the required length or number of buds.
Depending on the cane layout, the canes may or may not be able to overlap each other and may be wrapped/arched on single or dual wires.

WRAPPING/ARCHING AND TYING
The grower’s decision to wrap, arch or potentially both effects the way that this job is carried out but either can be done very easily.
Once the canes have been wrapped or arched, they will be tied to wire, using our tie guns from INFACO.

TRAINING
(ONLY REQUIRED FOR THE 2 STAGE REJUVENATION PROCESS)
After the second or third year of rejuvenation in the 2-stage process, we will begin to replace the old vine by selecting a strong and healthy watershoot which will be top tied and trained into the new vine.

WATERSHOOT SELECTION
After the first stage of the two-stage process is complete, a strong and healthy watershoot must be selected which will then become the new trunk of the vine. It is best to choose one that is positioned correctly and in line with the post and wire.
Once the watershoot has been selected, the remaining watershoots can be removed to ensure the energy and nutrition is being pumped into the selected watershoot as much as possible.

TOP TYING
The watershoot must then be encouraged to grow in the right direction and towards the cordon wire. The is done by trimming the watershoot and cutting the end through the middle of the bud to create a lip. A piece of bailing string is then looped over the lip of the watershoot and firmly tied to the cordon wire above.

HEADING
Heading, also known as tipping, is carried out to ensure the new trunk stops at the cordon wire and begins to grow new arms, creating the crown of the vine.

CANE PRUNING
The arms of the new vine are then trimmed, wrapped/arched and tied along the wire.
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MaxiCut Pty Limited

18 Quarry Rd
Woodside SA 5244
Australia
MaxiCut is a unique and innovative way to rejuvenate your vineyard using strong hydraulic vine shears that easily cut through tough vines and strong wires.

Our customers are grape growers, tired of using the outdated and inefficient old forms of vineyard rejuvenation and have turned to MaxiCut in need of a change.
They find value in MaxiCut due to our effective, time efficient and affordable services that allow them to remove eutypa, train new water shoots and replace their old, diseased vines with healthy new ones over a 2-3 year, 2 stage process, resulting in a 10-50% increase in production within the first year.

MaxiCut can also be used for grafting or simply just to convert from barrel to cane pruning
The MaxiCut process starts with the vine shears and is followed by wound dressing, rubbish disposal, re-wiring, cane pruning and training. (The system may vary depending on the growers requirements and the stage of the process).

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